UC gets new EvoBin to help reduce, reuse, and recycle

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UC gets new EvoBin to help reduce, reuse, and recycle

Miguel Gutierrez/ISLAND WAVES- TAMU-CC Green Team Member and alumni, Melissa Zemora demonstrates how the EvoBin works.

Miguel Gutierrez/ISLAND WAVES- TAMU-CC Green Team Member and alumni, Melissa Zemora demonstrates how the EvoBin works.

Miguel Gutierrez/ISLAND WAVES- TAMU-CC Green Team Member and alumni, Melissa Zemora demonstrates how the EvoBin works.

Miguel Gutierrez/ISLAND WAVES- TAMU-CC Green Team Member and alumni, Melissa Zemora demonstrates how the EvoBin works.

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On Monday, Oct. 7, the Islander Green Team unveiled the new EvoBin, located in the UC next to the Cove. The EvoBin is an interactive waste bin, which has separate containers for compost, recycling, and landfill trash.

The EvoBin also has interactive display screens above each container that is completely programmable and can be used to give helpful information to students and faculty, such as what actually can be recycled or composted.

This marks TAMU-CCs first post-consumer waste deposit site. According to Megan Greige, President of the Islander Green Team, “The compost is handled completely by student workers.”

Islander Green Team member, Megan Greige, answers questions from students and faculty about the new EvoBin.

The compost is then used to fertilize the garden run by the Islander Green Team. “We’ve collected coffee grounds from Starbucks and other consumer waste like fruit trimmings from the kitchen,” said Greige, “but this is the first time we can collect food waste directly from the students after its been eaten.”

The new EvoBin was paid for by the Green Fund. “There is this green fee, or green fund as it’s called, that’s two dollars and fifty cents of every students tuition,” said Greige, “and it does add up.”

“Of course, the EvoBin is the most recent project paid for by the green fee,” said Greige. “The EvoBins were expensive, they were about $12,000.” This high cost is because of the interactive displays, as well as the scales and sensors built into the bin, in order to keep detailed records.

If you are interested in helping the Islander Green Team out, you can contact them on I-Engage. For more news on campus, be sure to stay tuned with Island Waves.

TAMU-CC’s Islander Green Community Garden, where recycled products, compost and waste from the EvoBin, will hopefully help plants grow.